Operation: Puppy Love

I have lived my entire life in the south. My childhood was spent in the Forsyth County, NC suburb of Walkertown. During my high school years I resided briefly in Ewing, KY and Maysville, KY, before making a more permanent home in Bangs, TX, on a 200 acre cattle ranch with my grandfather. I’ve had dogs my entire life, and my family was very committed to having pets spayed/neutered. As a child & teen I never connected the spay/neuter surgery with all of the stray dogs, puppies, cats, and kittens that are so prevalent everywhere – city, suburb, backwoods, or rural cattle ranch – it didn’t matter where I lived, there were always strays and they were simply a fact of life. I was always sad to see them scavenging for food, or lying dead in the road, or being loaded into the dogcatcher’s truck… but it was one of those incontrovertible facts of life, just like those poor starving kids in Africa that I couldn’t help either.

As an adult in my mid-thirties, I must say I was astounded when I learned just a few short months ago that there are parts of this country – yes, I’m talking about the USA – where the spay/neuter laws are so strict there is a SHORTAGE OF PUPPIES! To me, strays are the norm, no matter their age, and it’s always been common knowledge that if one wants a puppy one can usually find a puppy at the shelter. If you don’t see what you’re looking for at the shelter, no problem – check out the “free to good home” ads in the paper… or better yet, wait til Saturday and go to a yard sale. That’s just how things are in the south.

Puppies are euthanized every day all over the south – we’ve got an OVER-abundance of the cute, furry, wriggly, face-licking tykes, with their warm little bodies and heavenly puppy breath, and not enough homes to go around. Another fact of life – that’s just how things are.

That’s not how things have to be. There are plenty of families in parts of this country that would love to adopt a puppy, and are on waiting lists because of the shortage. These are people who don’t really care what size or breed or color the puppy is – they just want a puppy. And they’ll love whatever puppy they get, and give it a good home – they might even squeeze it and call it George, who knows?

At some point, some kind-hearted soul put two and two together – connected the line between point A and point B – and said, “Eureka! Let’s bring puppies from the south and put them in homes in the north!”

Ah, if only it were that simple. How to get the puppies from point A to point B?

This is where North Shore Animal League comes in. NSAL is the largest animal shelter in the world. They are located in Port Washington, NY, the center of the puppy-free zone, and they have torch-and-pitchfork wielding mobs crowding at their gates daily demanding puppies.

Well, the torch-and-pitchfork analogy might be overkill… but I think you get the idea.

Here’s how Stokes County Humane Society’s partnership with North Shore Animal League works:

  • SCHS volunteers rescue puppies from the Stokes County Animal Shelter.
  • SCHS provides volunteer foster families with food, crates, bedding, toys, and veterinary care.
  • Volunteer foster families quarantine (for up to 10 days), vaccinate, worm, and love puppies for three to six weeks.
  • SCHS sends puppies to the vet for a check-up and a certificate of good health.
  • SCHS arranges to transport puppies to the ASPCA shelter in Martinsville, VA.
  • NSAL sends a transport shuttle from Port Washington, NY to Martinsville, VA.
  • Puppies are loaded onto the transport shuttle and taken to the NSAL shelter (sometimes foster mommies cry at this stage, FYI).
  • Puppies are vetted again, cleaned up, and put up for adoption.
  • Happy families in NY adopt puppies and love them for their whole furry lives.
  • Everyone lives happily ever after.

Seems simple enough, yes?

SCHS needs foster families and sponsors in order to make this program work. If you are interested in fostering one to three puppies for three to six weeks, or if you are able to sponsor one to three puppies (think vet bills, care expenses), please complete the Stokes County Humane Society volunteer application at http://www.stokescountyhumanesociety.com/volunteering.html today. Our volunteers have made us the organization we are today. Join SCHS – the sky is the limit for tomorrow.

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4 thoughts on “Operation: Puppy Love

  1. I have never heard of there being a shortage of puppies either! What exactly does the “strict” spay/neuter law up north say? I don’t understand why they don’t have enough puppies to go around~

    1. I’m not entirely sure how the law reads – I believe that pet owners who aren’t licensed breeders face very stiff fines if their pets aren’t fixed. I love it though – it gives puppies in other parts of the country a chance, which is great. Merry & Pippin aren’t the first foster pups of mine to go to NSAL as a result of their “puppy shortage” – my crippled foster dog, Baby, came with a litter of nine, and of those nine seven or eight made the trip to NY and were adopted through NSAL.

  2. I too live in the South 😦 and I am shocked there is a puppy shortage. How can that be? 27 puppies just went to a local animal shelter because a breeder couldn’t take care of them anymore. Not that it looked so much as if they were in the first place. These were small dogs, so pitiful. I so wish I could foster dogs but I am not able too.

    1. I know, I was stunned when I found out about it too. I love fostering – but I’m lucky to be in a place where I can and I know it. My sister would love to do it too but she can’t – her house is too small, no fenced in yard, her husband doesn’t like dogs that much to begin with, they already have a big hound mix, and their landlord said “No more pets.” So she comes to my house to get her puppy fix.

      I’m just glad that NY has the strict spay/neuter laws that they have – it makes it possible for us to save more puppies here and arrange to send them up there.

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